Follow-up care

Breast Cancer Follow-Up and Management After Primary Treatment

Guideline Status: Review in Progress Published in Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol 3, Issue 7 (March), 2013: 961-965 James L. Khatcheressian, Patricia Hurley, Elissa Bantug, Laura J. Esserman, Eva Grunfeld, Francine Halberg, Alexander Hantel, N. Lynn Henry, Hyman B. Muss, Thomas J. Smith, Victor G. Vogel, Antonio C. Wolff, Mark R. Somerfield, and Nancy E. Davidson Purpose To provide recommendations on the follow-up and management of patients with breast cancer who have completed primary therapy with curative intent.

Follow-Up Care for Colorectal Cancer

Key Messages: The primary goal of follow-up care for colorectal cancer is early detection of cancer that has returned after treatment. Follow-up care for colorectal cancer includes regular physical examinations, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) tests, computed tomography (CT) scans, and colonoscopy or rectosigmoidoscopy. Talk with your doctor about your risk of having the cancer come back and an appropriate follow-up care plan for you. The importance of follow-up care

Living as a Melanoma Skin Cancer Survivor

For many people with melanoma, treatment can remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You may be relieved to finish treatment, but find it hard not to worry about cancer growing or coming back. (When cancer comes back after treatment, it is called recurrent cancer or a recurrence.) This is very common if you’ve had cancer.

Living as a Prostate Cancer Survivor

For most men with prostate cancer, treatment can remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You may be relieved to finish treatment, but find it hard not to worry about cancer growing or coming back. This is very common if you’ve had cancer.

What Happens During and After Treatment for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Children?

During and after treatment for lymphoma, the main concerns for most families are the short- and long-term effects of the lymphoma and its treatment, and concerns about the lymphoma coming back. It is certainly normal to want to put the lymphoma and its treatment behind you and to get back to a life that doesn’t revolve around cancer. But it’s important to realize that follow-up care is a central part of this process that offers your child the best chance for recovery and long-term survival.

Living as a Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivor

For many people with Hodgkin lymphoma, treatment can destroy the lymphoma. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You may be relieved to finish treatment, but find it hard not to worry about the lymphoma coming back. (When cancer comes back after treatment, it is called a recurrence.) This is very common if you’ve had cancer.

Living as a Testicular Cancer Survivor

For most men with testicular cancer , treatment can remove or destroy the cancer. The end of treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You may be relieved to finish treatment, but yet it’s hard not to worry about cancer coming back. These feelings are very common if you’ve had cancer. Life after cancer means returning to some familiar things and also making some new choices.

Living As A Cervical Cancer Survivor

For some women with cervical cancer, treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You’ll be relieved to finish treatment, yet it’s hard not to worry about the cancer coming back. This is very common if you’ve had cancer. For other women, the cancer may never go away completely. These women may get regular treatments with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or other therapies to try to help keep the cancer in check. Learning to live with cancer that does not go away can be difficult and very stressful.

Living as a Small Cell Lung Cancer Survivor

For some people with lung cancer, treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You may be relieved to finish treatment, but find it hard not to worry about cancer growing or coming back. This is very common if you’ve had cancer.

Living as an Endometrial Cancer Survivor

For many women with endometrial cancer, treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You may be relieved to finish treatment, but find it hard not to worry about cancer coming back. (When cancer comes back after treatment, it is called recurrence.) This is a very common concern in people who have had cancer.