Follow-up care

Living as a Colorectal Cancer Survivor

For many people with colorectal cancer, treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. The end of treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You’ll be relieved to finish treatment, yet it’s hard not to worry about cancer coming back. This is very common if you’ve had cancer. For other people, colorectal cancer may never go away completely. Some people may get regular treatment with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or other treatments to try to help keep the cancer in check. Learning to live with cancer that does not go away can be difficult and very stressful.

Follow-Up Care for Breast Cancer (ASCO)

To help doctors provide their patients with the highest quality care, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) provides recommendations for follow-up care for women who have received treatment for breast cancer. This article combines recommendations updated in 2012 by ASCO and recommendations from ASCO and the American Cancer Society (ACS) developed in 2015.

Follow-Up Care After Breast Cancer Treatment (ACS)

Many women are relieved or excited to be finished with breast cancer treatment. But it can also be a time of worry for women who fear their cancer could come back, or who feel lost without the same frequency of visits with their cancer care team.

Living as a Bladder Cancer Survivor

For some people with bladder cancer, treatment can remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You may be relieved to finish treatment, but find it hard not to worry about cancer coming back. This is very common if you’ve had cancer.

What Happens after Treatment for Small Cell Lung Cancer?

For some people with lung cancer, treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You may be relieved to finish treatment, but find it hard not to worry about cancer growing or coming back. (When cancer comes back after treatment, it is called recurrence.) This is a very common concern in people who have had cancer.

Can I Get Another Cancer After Having Cervical Cancer?

Cancer survivors can be affected by a number of health problems, but often a major concern is facing cancer again. Cancer that comes back after treatment is called a recurrence. But some cancer survivors may develop a new, unrelated cancer later. This is called a second cancer. Unfortunately, being treated for cervical cancer doesn’t mean you can’t get another cancer. Women who have had cervical cancer can still get the same types of cancers that other women get. In fact, they might be at higher risk for certain types of cancer, including:

Follow-Up Care, Surveillance Protocol, and Secondary Prevention Measures for Survivors of Colorectal Cancer Endorsement

Guideline Status: Review in Progress Published online before print November 12, 2013, doi: 10.1200/JCO.2013.50.7442 Jeffrey Meyerhardt, Pamela B. Mangu, Patrick J. Flynn, Larissa Korde, Charles L. Loprinzi, Bruce D. Minsky, Nicholas J. Petrelli, Kim Ryan, Deborah H. Schrag, Sandra L. Wong, and Al B. Benson III Purpose Purpose The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing recent clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations.

Second Cancers After Testicular Cancer

Cancer survivors can be affected by a number of health problems, but often their greatest concern is facing cancer again. If a cancer comes back after treatment it's called a recurrence. But some cancer survivors may develop a new, unrelated cancer later. This is called a second cancer. Unfortunately, being treated for cancer doesn’t mean you can’t get cancer again. People who have had cancer can still get the same types of cancers that other people get. In fact, certain types of cancer and cancer treatments are linked to a higher risk of certain second cancers.

What Happens After Treatment for Childhood Leukemia?

During and after treatment for childhood leukemia, the main concerns for most families are the short- and long-term effects of the leukemia and its treatment, and concerns about the leukemia coming back. It’s certainly normal to want to put the leukemia and its treatment behind you and to get back to a life that doesn’t revolve around cancer. But it’s important to realize that follow-up care is a central part of this process that offers your child the best chance for recovery and long-term survival.

Living As a Soft Tissue Sarcoma Survivor

For some people with soft tissue sarcoma , treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You may be relieved to finish treatment, but find it hard not to worry about cancer coming back. This is a very common if you've had cancer. For other people, the cancer may never go away completely. They might get regular treatments with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or other therapies to try to help keep the cancer in check. Learning to live with cancer that does not go away can be difficult and very stressful.