Cervical cancer

Fertility Concerns and Preservation for Women

Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board, 04/2018 Many cancer treatments affect fertility temporarily or permanently. Fertility is the ability to become pregnant. Infertility is an inability to become pregnant or maintain a pregnancy. Before treatment begins, talk with your health care team. Ask how treatment could affect your fertility. And ask about your options for preserving fertility. How cancer treatments affect fertility Fertility problems from cancer or cancer treatment occur in 2 main ways:

Side Effects of Cancer Treatment

Cancer treatments and cancer can cause side effects. Side effects are problems that occur when treatment affects healthy tissues or organs. Speak up about any side effects you have, or changes you notice, so your health care team can treat or help you to reduce these side effects. Learn about steps you can take to prevent or manage the side effects listed below:

Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (Physician Data Query) (For Professionals)

During the past five decades, dramatic progress has been made in the development of curative therapy for pediatric malignancies. Long-term survival into adulthood is the expectation for more than 80% of children with access to contemporary therapies for pediatric malignancies.[1,2] The therapy responsible for this survival can also produce adverse long-term health-related outcomes, referred to as late effects, which manifest months to years after completion of cancer treatment.

Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Treatment

Today, because of advances in treatment, more than 8 out of 10 children treated for cancer survive at least 5 years, and most of these children are cured. But the treatments that help these children survive their cancer can also cause health problems later on.

Dealing with Emotions: Anxiety, Fear, and Depression

Having cancer affects your emotional health A cancer diagnosis can have a huge impact on most patients, families, and caregivers. Feelings of depression, anxiety, and fear are very common and are normal responses to this life-changing experience.

Eating Hints After Cancer Treatment

Excerpted from Eating Hints: Before, During, and After Cancer.  People with Cancer Have Different Diet Needs People with cancer often need to follow diets that are different from what you think of as healthy. For most people, a healthy diet includes:

Coping With Radiation Treatment

Like other cancer treatments, radiation may cause unpleasant side effects, such as overall fatigue, skin irritation, and other side effects depending on the part of the body being treated. Every person reacts differently to treatment. Any side effects you might have depend on the type of cancer, location, dose of radiation, and your general health. Some people have no side effects at all, while others have quite a few. There’s no way to know who might have side effects. Before treatment, ask your cancer care team what you might expect.

Sweating

Sweating is heavy perspiration that can happen at night or even when the room is cool. There may be enough to soak your clothes. Such sweating is common when a fever breaks. You may notice that you sweat a lot a short time after shaking chills.

What to Expect When Meeting With a Genetic Counselor

Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board, 04/2018 Cancer genetic counseling involves having a certified genetic counselor help you and your family understand your inherited cancer risk. Inherited cancer risk may be passed from parent to child. A genetic counselor explains available genetic tests and what they mean. He or she can also offer information about cancer screening, prevention, and treatment options and provide support.

Anxiety, Fear, and Emotional Distress

Anxiety (a feeling of worry or unease), fear, uncertainty, anger, and sadness are common feelings that patients and families sometimes have when coping with cancer. They are normal responses to the many stresses of cancer.