Patients

Eating Hints After Cancer Treatment

Excerpted from Eating Hints: Before, During, and After Cancer.  People with Cancer Have Different Diet Needs People with cancer often need to follow diets that are different from what you think of as healthy. For most people, a healthy diet includes:

Coping With Radiation Treatment

Like other cancer treatments, radiation may cause unpleasant side effects, such as overall fatigue, skin irritation, and other side effects depending on the part of the body being treated. Every person reacts differently to treatment. Any side effects you might have depend on the type of cancer, location, dose of radiation, and your general health. Some people have no side effects at all, while others have quite a few. There’s no way to know who might have side effects. Before treatment, ask your cancer care team what you might expect.

Cancer Can Affect a Man’s Ability to Ejaculate

How cancer treatment can affect ejaculation Cancer treatment can interfere with ejaculation by damaging the nerves that control the prostate, seminal vesicles, and the opening to the bladder. It can also stop semen from being made in the prostate and seminal vesicles, or it can cut off the path that semen normally takes out of the body. Despite this, a man can still feel the sensation of pleasure that makes an orgasm. The difference is that, at the moment of orgasm, little or no semen comes out. This is referred to as a “dry orgasm.”

Living As a Soft Tissue Sarcoma Survivor

For some people with soft tissue sarcoma , treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You may be relieved to finish treatment, but find it hard not to worry about cancer coming back. This is a very common if you've had cancer. For other people, the cancer may never go away completely. They might get regular treatments with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or other therapies to try to help keep the cancer in check. Learning to live with cancer that does not go away can be difficult and very stressful.

Sweating

Sweating is heavy perspiration that can happen at night or even when the room is cool. There may be enough to soak your clothes. Such sweating is common when a fever breaks. You may notice that you sweat a lot a short time after shaking chills.

What to Expect When Meeting With a Genetic Counselor

Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board, 04/2018 Cancer genetic counseling involves having a certified genetic counselor help you and your family understand your inherited cancer risk. Inherited cancer risk may be passed from parent to child. A genetic counselor explains available genetic tests and what they mean. He or she can also offer information about cancer screening, prevention, and treatment options and provide support.

Anxiety, Fear, and Emotional Distress

Anxiety (a feeling of worry or unease), fear, uncertainty, anger, and sadness are common feelings that patients and families sometimes have when coping with cancer. They are normal responses to the many stresses of cancer.

Follow-Up Care for Colorectal Cancer

Key Messages: The primary goal of follow-up care for colorectal cancer is early detection of cancer that has returned after treatment. Follow-up care for colorectal cancer includes regular physical examinations, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) tests, computed tomography (CT) scans, and colonoscopy or rectosigmoidoscopy. Talk with your doctor about your risk of having the cancer come back and an appropriate follow-up care plan for you. The importance of follow-up care

Living as a Melanoma Skin Cancer Survivor

For many people with melanoma, treatment can remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You may be relieved to finish treatment, but find it hard not to worry about cancer growing or coming back. (When cancer comes back after treatment, it is called recurrent cancer or a recurrence.) This is very common if you’ve had cancer.

Living as a Prostate Cancer Survivor

For most men with prostate cancer, treatment can remove or destroy the cancer. Completing treatment can be both stressful and exciting. You may be relieved to finish treatment, but find it hard not to worry about cancer growing or coming back. This is very common if you’ve had cancer.